Showing posts with label Iceland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Iceland. Show all posts

Monday, 8 January 2018

Mount Kirkjufell, Iceland


Mt. Kirkjufell (463 m) is the most prominent mountain near the town of Grundarfjörður. It is most beautiful landmark and photographed mountain in Iceland the icon of the Snaefellsnes Peninsula. The mountain of Kirkjufell and its waterfall Kirkjufellsfoss, attracts nature lovers and photographers. Its isolated location jutting out into the sea makes it a focal point for tourists and seamen alike. The area surrounded by beaches, lovely walking trail around it as well as a more challenging climb up to the top where bird and fish fossils can be found. There’s something exclusive about the shape of Mt. Kirkjufell, green in summer, orange in winter and white with snow. However, with aurora borealis it provides breathtaking views. The best time to catch the Northern Lights in Iceland is between September and January.

Even photographers waiting for many hours to capture sun rise and sun set view.  The mountain is free-standing and referred to as the most beautiful mountain as you’ll see crowds of visitors with tripods and cameras taking photos like the one above, i.e. from this angle with the waterfall in front. Kirkjufell is most favorite for film making location featuring as the "arrowhead mountain" that the Hound and the company north of the Wall see when capturing a wight. Kirkjufell is formed with a stack of layers of sedimentary rocks from glacial and interglacial stages. At the base is Tertiary Lava and then it alternates between Sandstone, and Quaternary lava. At the top is tuff and during the last Ice age, erosion shaped it. Their sides are so steep because it was a high rock pressured between 2 glacier tongues. It is possible to hike to the top of Kirkjufell but difficult hike with very steep sections. Do not go by yourself as it is very dangerous, get hire an experienced guide that can take you through the right tracks.











Thursday, 28 September 2017

Moss Covered Lava Fields in Iceland


In Iceland Moss is a common plant, widely grows in the mountainous region. The moss has a special characteristic of Iceland’s lava fields. However, the southern coast of Iceland over Eldraun Lava field is one of the most remarkable moss blankets in Iceland. The recorded history exposed a devastating eruption created the lave fields in Eldraun. In 1783 the Laki fissure and the adjoining Grímsvötn volcano poured out an expected 14 cubic kilometers of basalt lava and clouds of poisonous gases that contaminated the soil, killing half of Iceland's cattle and horses, and more than three-quarter of sheep. Moss can be easily damaged and potentially irreparably. Moss areas are particularly sensitive and damage caused by footprints and tire marks can take a very long time to heal.

However, in that year, nothing grew on the fields and no fish found in the sea. This was resulting in famine killed approximately a quarter of the island’s human population. Therefore, Laki’s eruption had even more widespread effects. In the years following the eruption, the climate across the Northern Hemisphere deteriorated. In the winter of 1784, the North America became the longest and one of the coldest on record. Thus, massive snowstorm hit the South, the Mississippi River froze at New Orleans and there were reports of ice floes in the Gulf of Mexico.

Moreover, huge Haze from the eruption floated east as far away as India weakening monsoon circulations and leading to drought and crop failures. Moreover, in 1784 the famine that hit Egypt, as a result of the eruption, killed approximately 1/6 of its population. Hence, the worst consequences were felt in Europe. The summer of 1783 was the hottest on record and a rare high-pressure zone over Iceland caused the winds to blow to the south-east. The poisonous cloud drifted across Europe, and its inhalation killed tens of thousands. In Great Britain alone, it caused some 23,000 deaths.

As the weather became hot, thunderstorms became more severe and large hailstones rained down from the sky causing injury and death to cattle. The following winter was tremendously cold and result in 8,000 extra deaths in the UK. Even though, in the during the spring thaw, Germany and Central Europe reported faced catastrophic flood damage. A series of crop failures in France and the causing poverty and famine eventually triggered the French Revolution of 1789-1799. Nowadays, the Eldraun Lava Field looks very serene and tranquil. The thick green moss has helped softened the rugged landscape, almost disguising Eldhraun’s violent past.













Tuesday, 5 September 2017

Reynisfjara, The Rarest Black Sand Beach in Iceland


White sandy beaches are off course yes for all. But what you do, when there’s a lava beach that has risen from the ashes? Actually, Iceland has many volcanic beaches, but Reynisfjara Black Sand Beach is hands down the coolest with its black sand, insane basalt columns, lava formations, towering cliffs, and caves. One of the rarest beaches on the planet is located near the village of Vík í Mýrdal, in Iceland, which faces the open Atlantic Ocean and is situated in 180 kilometers from Reykjavik. You won’t find garbage on the beach; people are infrequently guests here due to the cold and wet weather. Southern Iceland is framed by a black sand beach that was ranked in 1991 as one of the ten most beautiful non-tropical beaches in the world.

In Iceland this is wettest place, as rains are permanent feature, as here for 340 days a year. Moreover sand is also clean from the stones and any other impurities. It’s clean fine sand of tremendously black color! The clarification is very simple, because during the volcanic eruption, lava flowed into the ocean and cooled there, and then, for the long centuries water used to break it into tiny particles making exceptional kind of sand. Thus, progressively the water ousted it to the coast. The American journal “Islands Magazine” named this outstanding black beach one of the 10 most astonishing non-tropical beaches on the planet. The coastline of the strange black sand beach stretches for five kilometers.

The black basalt columns are called “Reynisdrangar” and they appeared as a result of exposure of the water on the coastal cliffs. They are located next to the majestic towering mountain Reynisfyadl. Furthermore, this area is popular for its caves and huge black boulders. The creatures petrified here, when couldn’t hide from the sun in time. However, to drag three ships ashore, other to sink the Icelandic ship. The locals of such unusual places like this like to turn everything into a fairy tale, maybe, to attract tourists, or they can really trust in it. Moreover, cold water of the coast beach, the infinite fogs, penetrating winds and somber landscapes but a sense of delight wins the gloom; everything here seems to be very distinct and scarce! The unreal surroundings beckon travelers, photographers and filmmakers. Some kind of science fiction or horror film is often filmed here. Reynisfjara black sand beach is seriously one of the coolest places in Iceland. A MUST see for anyone doing a South Iceland drive or looking for a day trip from Reykjavik.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Friday, 25 August 2017

Reynisfjara Beach, Iceland

White sandy beaches are off course yes for all. But what you do, when there’s a lava beach that has risen from the ashes? Actually, Iceland has many volcanic beaches, but Reynisfjara Black Sand Beach is hands down the coolest with its black sand, insane basalt columns, lava formations, towering cliffs, and caves. One of the rarest beaches on the planet is located near the village of Vík í Mýrdal, in Iceland, which faces the open Atlantic Ocean and is situated in 180 kilometers from Reykjavik. You won’t find garbage on the beach; people are infrequently guests here due to the cold and wet weather. Southern Iceland is framed by a black sand beach that was ranked in 1991 as one of the ten most beautiful non-tropical beaches in the world.
In Iceland this is wettest place, as rains are permanent feature, as here for 340 days a year. Moreover sand is also clean from the stones and any other impurities. It’s clean fine sand of tremendously black color! The clarification is very simple, because during the volcanic eruption, lava flowed into the ocean and cooled there, and then, for the long centuries water used to break it into tiny particles making exceptional kind of sand. Thus, progressively the water ousted it to the coast. The American journal “Islands Magazine” named this outstanding black beach one of the 10 most astonishing non-tropical beaches on the planet. The coastline of the strange black sand beach stretches for five kilometers.
The black basalt columns are called “Reynisdrangar” and they appeared as a result of exposure of the water on the coastal cliffs. They are located next to the majestic towering mountain Reynisfyadl. Furthermore, this area is popular for its caves and huge black boulders. The creatures petrified here, when couldn’t hide from the sun in time. However, to drag three ships ashore, other to sink the Icelandic ship. The locals of such unusual places like this like to turn everything into a fairy tale, maybe, to attract tourists, or they can really trust in it. Moreover, cold water of the coast beach, the infinite fogs, penetrating winds and somber landscapes but a sense of delight wins the gloom; everything here seems to be very distinct and scarce! The unreal surroundings beckon travelers, photographers and filmmakers. Some kind of science fiction or horror film is often filmed here. Reynisfjara black sand beach is seriously one of the coolest places in Iceland. A MUST see for anyone doing a South Iceland drive or looking for a day trip from Reykjavik.



















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