Showing posts with label Canada. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Canada. Show all posts

Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Bouctouche Dune | La dune de Bouctouche, Canada


Bouctouche is a Canadian town, located at the mouth of the Bouctouche River on the coast of the Northumberland, Canada. The Bouctouche Dune or Sandbar is connected to the mainland at a point approximately 3 ½ miles north of Pointe à Jérôme and ranges southeast for over seven miles, providing protection for the waters of Buctouche Bay. The sandbar lies about a mile off of Saint-Thomas-de-Kent, near where the Point Dixon Range Lights were established in 1881 to support vessels in finding the entrance to the bay. Well maintained saltwater beach, frontage is an ideal location for enjoying nature and a focal point for ecotourism. Visitors to this area of the New Brunswick coast will find a memorable tourism experience in a unique natural environment.

Therefore, a footbridge built on the abutments of the old railroad bridge attaches Le Pays de la Sagouine and Rotary Park from the opposite side of the Bouctouche River. Nowadays, the dune can be shared by people who want to relish its singular beauty. The boardwalk is wheelchair, accessible with ramps to the beach and inner bay, and as such, this earth-cache is wheelchair friendly. La dune de Bouctouche was established by J. D. Irving, Limited to keep and restore the significant sand dune that provides habitat for many shorebirds and other migratory birds. A two-kilometer-long boardwalk lets visitors to feel the sense of flora and fauna found on the dune without impacting the subtle ecosystem. The beach is located on the site of the Irving Eco-centre, la Dune de Bouctouche, where a team of interpreters delivers programs and presentations throughout the season to make this coastal habitat known to as many people as possible.
Moreover, a lighthouse on the southern extremity of Buctouche sand bar was put in operation in 1902. The lighthouse is a square wooden building, prevailed by a square wooden lantern rising from the middle of the cottage roof. Thus, the building and lantern are painted white. The lighthouse is 35 feet high from its base to the ventilator on the lantern, and is located on land 4 feet above high water mark. The light is fixed white dioptric, elevated 38 feet above high water mark, and noticeable 11 miles from all points of approach by water. The work was done by Mr. G.W. Palmer, of Kars, whose contract price for the building was $1,289.In 1907, 375 feet of close pilework was put in place to protect the lighthouse from the encroaching sea, and the following year roughly 400 more feet of pipework were added and the boathouse was moved back to a safer position. Source: CP










Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Canada’s Smoking Hills

The smoking hills are well believed to have been burning for centuries, and will do so for many years to come. Most people perceive the Arctic as a clean, pristine environment, but the Smoking Hills, located 350 km east of the Mackenzie Delta, are a natural source of air pollution.  In 1850, British Captain Robert McClure was sent on an expedition aboard the Investigator to the Arctic to pursuit for the lost expedition of Sir John Franklin who had departed England 5 years earlier. It was the second exploration party who went searching for the 129-crew Arctic exploration team, and one of several dozens that were to follow for the next four decades.

Therefore, the Investigator sailed north through the Pacific and entered the Arctic Ocean by way of Bering Strait, sailing eastward past Point Barrow, Alaska to in due course link up with another British expedition from the north-west. When McClure’s exploration party reached the mouth of the river Horton on Beaufort Sea near Cape Bathurst in Canada's Northwest Territories, he observed smoke in the distance. He is suspecting the smokes could be coming from campfires, maybe from Franklin, McClure at once sent a search party to investigate. The party found not flames from Franklin's campfires, but thick columns of smoke emerging from vents in the ground. The sailors get back with a sample of the smoldering rock, and set it down on McClure's desk it burned a hole in the wood.

He thought that rocks to be volcanic, but the fact was something else. The mountains contains actually a large deposits of sulphur-rich lignite (brown coal) which ignite instinctively when the hills erode and the mineral veins are exposed to the air. The fumes they give off comprise sulphur dioxide, sulphuric acid and steam, all of which has acidified the surrounding shallow pools making a pocket of distinguishing acidic biota, in contrast to the typically Arctic biota in adjacent alkaline ponds. Though the soil of the region contains much limestone, the buffer effect has totally disappeared. The adjacent community, “Paulatuk or traditionally spelt Place of Coal”, which is about 105 km east, is named in recognition of the coal found in the area. Source: Charismaticplanet.com
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Friday, 27 May 2016

The Magical Spotted Lake, Canada



Spotted Lake is a saline endorheic alkali lake draws countless visitors from around the world located near the city of Osoyoos in British Columbia Canada. The Lake has rich of minerals such as magnesium sulfate, calcium and sodium sulphate and contains extremely high concentrations of minerals such as silver and titanium. In summer, Lake Water evaporates leaving behind colorful mineral deposits. The ameoba-shaped Spotted Lake, changes colors throughout the year and during the summer time divides itself into white, green, blue and yellow pools. It is said that the lake has the highest natural concentration of this mineral in the world. 

The colorful large spots appears according to mineral composition, Magnesium sulfate normally crystallizes in summer play a major role to spot color and remaining minerals in the lake harden to form natural walkways around and between the spots.  Nowadays, the spotted lake is surrounded by a fence to keep people off, but you can get a good view of it from the highway.

These minerals were used in the manufacture of ammunition during First World War. Chinese labour force skimmed up ton a day of salts from Lake Surface and shipped them to munitions vendors in eastern Canada. Later on, the site came under the control of the Ernest Smith Family for a term of about 40 years. The Ernest Smith attempted to create interest in a spa at the lake in 1979. 

Spotted Lake is a strange and significantly important site having great potential of commercial exploitation presently hype much controversy. The native peoples used the lake mud and water for the treatment of aches and ailments. Therefore, officially, Spotted Lake is on private land and therefore theoretically not accessible for close up observation. It is actually recognized to the First Nations of the Okanagan Valley as Kliluk. The spotted lake is surrounded by cairns rock piles often indicating graves. You cannot miss this historic landmark as you drive along the highway just west of the city. A lot of people stop on the side of the road for a longer look.  


Tuesday, 9 February 2016

Lake Anjikuni, The Mysterious Vanishing Village



Lake Anjikuni is incredible phenomena when entire village vanishes and nowhere to be found. Lake Anjikuni is a lake in Kivalliq Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is one of several lakes located along the Kazan River; Ennadai Lake is to the south and Yathkyed Lake is to the north.The Lake Anjikuni takes the things to the next level and disappears the entire village. The incident took place in Nov 1930, when a trapper named Joe Labelle was looking for shelter for night. Although he was very much familiar with the village, whose population was around 2000 peoples? So, you might not believe it, he made his way there and found quite an eerie scene the villagers were nowhere to be found, everything else, including food and rifles had been left behind. Since then, the story of Angikuni Lake has been a mainstay of Canadian mystery lore.

The normal signs of life were entirely absent. Even no laughter or the hubbub of conversation was detected. Therefore, Labelle telegraphed the RCMP and an investigation started how the entire village burial ground it was revealed that at least one (sources vary) grave had been opened, clearly not by animals, and emptied. In addition, about 300 feet from the village, the seven bodies 7 sled dogs were found, having starved to death despite open stores of food at the village. However, some versions of the story even report weird lights being seen above the lake around the time of the disappearance.

Therefore, what would really happen? Not confirmed yet, however there have been all sorts of claims about the cause for the disappearance, including aliens, ghosts, and even vampires. However, RCMP’s own website disregards the story as an urban legend, but with so various versions of it floating around from so numbers of years ago, it’s extremely hard to be certain. Except about the vampires, as believe can be certain it wasn’t vampires. Currently, no physical evidence exists of a village at Angikuni Lake, and nobody has ever published an account of going up there and clearing away any remnants. So mainly trust on documentary evidence to find the real history of the vanishing village.

Sunday, 27 September 2015

The Natural Smoking Hills of Canada



In the middle of eighteen century (1850), a British Captain Robert McClure was sent on an expedition to aboard the Investigator to the Arctic to hunt for the lost expedition of Sir John Franklin who had departed England 5 years earlier. It was the 2nd exploration party who went searching for the 129-crew Arctic exploration team, and one of several dozens that were to follow for the next four decades.
Therefore, the Investigator sailed north through the Pacific and entered the Arctic Ocean by way of Bering Strait, sailing eastward past Point Barrow, Alaska to sooner or later link up with another British excursion from the north-west. However, when McClure’s search party comes close to the mouth of the river Horton on Beaufort Sea near Cape Bathurst in Canada's Northwest Territories, he observed smoke in the some distance. Though, suspecting the smokes could be from campfires, maybe from Franklin, McClure at once sent an exploration party to investigate. Nevertheless the party found not flames from Franklin's campfires, but thick columns of smoke evolving from vents in the ground. Then the sailors returned with a sample of the smoldering rock, and set it down on McClure's desk it burned a hole in the wood.

Hence, McClure presumed the rocks to be volcanic, but the real truth was something else. The mountains comprise large deposits of sulphur-rich lignite (brown coal) which ignite impulsively when the hills erode and the mineral veins are uncovered to the air. The fumes they give off comprise sulphur dioxide, sulphuric acid and steam, all of which has acidified the nearby shallow pools making a pocket of distinguishing acidic biota, in disparity to the naturally Arctic biota in nearby alkaline ponds. Thus, The Smoking Hills is thought to have been burning for many centuries, and will do so for many more.

Monday, 26 January 2015

Sunwapta Falls Canada

Sunwapta Falls is a waterfall of the Sunwapta River located in Jasper National Park, Canada. Sunwapta is a Stoney word, which means “turbulent river”.  Sunwapta waterfall is most spectacular in the late spring when the water flow is at its peak. The water actually originates from the Athabasca Glacier, and massive volumes are high in early summer caused by glacial meltdown. Sunwapta falls is accessible via a short drive off the Ice fields Parkway that connects Jasper and Banff National Parks. The falls have a lovely drop of around 18.5 metres. Moreover; there’re actually two falls, one is a lower and an upper one. Normally majority of tourist sees the upper falls which access is relevant easy. The lower falls are a short distance away.

At the falls, the Sunwapta River suddenly changes course from northwest to southwest and plunges in a cloud of spray into a deep canyon. This is a picnic spot, and seasonal accommodation and dining are available, as are picnic sites. A frozen wonder in winter, Sunwapta Falls will delight photographers with its eerie "ice sculptures". Sunwapta Falls was another one of those waterfalls which is same to Athabasca falls. Furthermore, the walkways and viewing areas didn’t as extensive as that of Athabasca Falls, but it’s pretty much safe views that could possibly get in less than 15 minutes from the car park.

The Sunwapta falls is really marvelous place and there’s nothing like that gorgeous turquoise water. Sunwapta falls is a famous and frequently photographed waterfall on Sunwapta River. The gorgeous glacial waters of river are dividing around a treed island. Wet black limestone spire sticks out of the face of the falls, and falls burst out of a constricted gorge into a potent milky plunge. If you’re photography lover, then you must go the upper falls which’s more photogenic Canadian waterfall. This waterfall is definite combination of majestic beauty of Mother Nature.